The Ayurvedic Self-Care Essentials

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I firmly believe that self-care practices should be easy to incorporate into your life, fit any budget, and not require you to accumulate a lot of special items–especially when you’re still trying these components of your routine on for size to see if they’re right for you. So while you really don’t need anything new or special for an Ayurvedic self-care routine, there are some tools that can make your life easier and others that allow you to upgrade or increase the efficiency and effectiveness of everything you do. Here are some of my favorite things.

Tongue Cleaner

I often say that not all tongue cleaners are created equal. I affirm this, as the material, shape, and thickness vary, and some just feel better and easier to use. Banyan Botanicals makes a lot of my favorite products, so it should come as no surprise that they make my favorite tongue cleaner. Theirs is made of stainless steel, which is great for any dosha.

Dry Brush and Garshana Gloves

Dry brushing is an invigorating practice that increases circulation of blood and lymph while simultaneously preparing your body to receive oil massage, as it sloughs away any lingering dry skin. I personally prefer a long handled brush so I can reach all areas of my body with ease, but I also really love using garshana gloves. Garshana gloves are gentler and, in my opinion, better for those who are prone to vata imbalances. Not to mention, a breeze to toss into your suitcase when traveling.

Daily Massage Oil (Abhyanga Oil)

Though it can at times feel like a lengthy or even messy process, the practice of abhyanga is one of Ayurveda’s most profound rituals. It involves applying warm oil to your body before you shower, allowing it to hydrate your skin and nourish your tissue. Each dosha or doshic imabalance should be using a preferred oil, yet there are some that are tridoshic or good for all doshas. I have so many favorite oils–I could write an entire post on only oils! I’ll save that for later, and tell you that the two tridoshic oils I recommend most are Banyan Botanicals Daily Massage Oil and Sarada Tridoshic Oil.

Nasya Oil

I’ve found that my clients can be hesitant to start the practice of nasya, as putting oil in your nose is quite unconventional. However, once they get into the routine of it, they find how great it is for preventing symptoms of allergies, dry air, and even for reducing illnesses. Yet again, Banyan is top pick for me with a mild, yet effective nasya oil. Theirs is great for beginner or seasoned nasya oil users. Going more traditional, and also a little more intense, you can use anu thailam from Kerala Ayurveda.

Ear Oil or Karna Purna

Oiling your ears is a vata reducing practice, and more obviously, is great for conditions of the ear like tinnitus, earaches, and even conditions of the head and neck that may seem unassociated, such as facial tension. There are herbs like mullein and garlic that have an affinity for healing ear conditions, and Wally’s Ear Oil has both, along with organic ingredients.

Disclosure: some of the links above are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

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